2014/33 / EC- Lifts and safety components

A 2014/33 / EU elevator decree has been issued to ensure that elevators are put on the market in such a way as not to pose a health and safety risk to end users. This rule applies to elevators and elevator safety elements used in buildings.

A 2014/33 / EU elevator decree has been issued to ensure that elevators are put on the market in such a way as not to pose a health and safety risk to end users. This rule applies to elevators and elevator safety elements used in buildings.

The elevator directive has a dual purpose: to allow the free movement of elevators and safety elements for elevators, while ensuring that such products provide a high level of protection for people's health and safety. This Directive provides elevator installers and manufacturers of safety components with a wide range of conformity assessment procedures based on so-called “modules”. Thus, the Elevator Directive is a good example of a “Global and New Approach to Conformity Assessment”.

"Lift" means a device serving certain levels, having a carrier moving along rails that are rigid and inclined at an angle of more than 15 degrees horizontally, intended to be carried:

people,

people and goods and

the goods themselves, if the carrier is available, that is, the person can enter it without problems, and are equipped with controls located inside the carrier or within the reach of a person inside the carrier.

The directive does not actually define a “security component”. Most of the components of the elevator somehow contribute to its safe operation. However, safety components for elevators are components that are designed for safety, and not just for normal elevator operation. Safety components for elevators are listed in Annex IV of the Directive.

The visible CE mark indicates that the elevator and safety components comply with the essential requirements of the Health and Safety Directive and have been subjected to an appropriate conformity assessment procedure. The best way to presume compliance with basic safety and health requirements is to apply harmonized standards, published in the Official Journal of the European Union. Most of the harmonized standards for elevators are developed by the CEN Technical Committee. CEN TC 10 has developed a specific numbering system for elevator standards, and the elevator family of standards has the common number EN 81.